Publications: Supply Chain Management & Compliance

Compliance, Continual Process Improvement, and Supply Chain Management

Compliance, Continual Process Improvement, and Supply Chain Management

About Publications: Supply Chain Management & Compliance. During and after a 4-year DHS-funded research project, the partners of Prep4Audit and our Colleagues worked together to publish a number of  reports and articles. To a large extent, these publications focused upon the intersection of compliance and supply chain management and dealt with the areas of security, safety, and sustainability.

Many of the Joint articles written, in some combination, by Drs. Omar Keith Helferich, Douglas M Voss, and John E Griggs are provided as downloadable PDF files.

As the “academicians” of the group, Dr. Helferich and Dr. Voss both have scores of articles and books. A condensed list of those articles and books were selected for their relevance to supply chain management and compliance via the continual improvement process of PDCA.

Partner and Colleague Publications

NEW   DBMA_Assimilating Quality and Sustainability

The Role of Security in Food Supplier Selection Decisions

Mitigation of (Food) Supply Chain Risk

Sustainability – The Long View

Combating the Impact of Product Counterfeiting

Compliance Concepts for Your Boss

Securing the Food Supply Network through Web-based Tracability

Go to the Top

Selected Articles by O. Keith Helferich, PhD

Helferich: Selected Articles and Publications

Helferich, Omar Keith, M. Douglas Voss, John E. Griggs, (2008), “Mitigation of Supply Chain Network Risk: Research and Results Applied to Security and Sustainability”, Distribution Management Journal, Volume 7, 2008.

Douglas Voss, David J. Closs, Roger Calantone, Omar K. Helferich, and Cheri Speier, manuscript MS # 07-022, “The Role of Security in the Food Supplier Selection Decision” accepted for publication in the Journal of Business Logistics, 2008.

Helferich, Omar K. , M. Douglas Voss, and John E. Griggs (2006), “Assessment, Compliance and Corrective Action: Application to Catastrophic Incident Planning and Response-Katrina”, Presentation to National Environmental Health Association Annual Educational Conference, June 2006, San Antonio, TX.

Helferich, Omar K., M. Douglas Voss, and John E. Griggs (2007 and 2008), “ Environmental Health Profession All-Hazards Needs and Challenges- Statistical Results of the 2007 Joint NEHA and Michigan State University National Survey”, Presentations to the National Health Association Educational Conference June 2007 and June 2008. Tucson, AZ.

Helferich, Omar K., “Supply Chain Security and Sustainability”, Annual Presentations to the Michigan State University Executive Development Program 2004-2008. Michigan State University, Henry Executive Development Center, East Lansing, Michigan.

Helferich, Omar K., “Supply Chain Security and Sustainability”, Presentation to Arkansas Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals, (CSCMP), Little Rock, August 2008.

Helferich, Omar K., Jim Stephenson, and Barbara Riester, “Critical Materials Staging Area- Initial Response to Catastrophic California Earthquake”, full day course- Development and Presentation to Red Cross Disaster Volunteers, Bay Area California, September 2008.

Helferich, Omar K., and Steven Dunn, “Supply Chain Management Sustainability” Development and presentation of full day workshop for supply chain professionals; Distribution Business Supply Chain Leadership Conference, Phoenix, AZ Conference June 2008.

Helferich, Omar K., “Presentation to the West Michigan Supply Chain Conference on Safe and Efficient Supply Chain Solutions, Grand Rapids, March 2005.

Helferich, Omar K., “Presentation to the Food Products Association on the Department of Homeland Security research initiatives, Washington, March 2005.

Helferich, Omar K., “Presentation to the SW Environmental Conference on use of Operational Risk Management for Food and Environmental Auditing, Nevada, February 2005.

Helferich, Omar K. “Supply Chain Security”, Proceedings of Council of Logistics Management, 2002 and 2003.

Helferich, Omar K., “Securing the Supply Chain”, Journal of Distribution Business Management, 2003.

Helferich, Omar K., Thomas M. Deeb, and Karen L. Griggs, “Securing the Food Supply Network through Web Based Traceability”, published Spring/Summer 2004, Journal of Distribution Management, 2004.

Schon, Stephen J., Michigan State University; and Omar Keith Helferich, “Expert Systems Applications in Customer Service,” Working Paper, 1987.

“Use of Neural Networks Plus Statistics for Early Production Forecasting,” 1991.

Allen, Mary K., Robert L. Cook, and Omar Keith Helferich, “Expert Systems Applied to Logistics,” Working Paper, 1987.

Helferich, Omar Keith and David Sheets, “Fourth Generation Software: An Overview for the Materials and Logistics Manager,” Working Paper, 1985.

Helferich, Omar Keith and Raymond L. Rowland, “Expert Systems Software: An Overview for the Materials and Logistics Manager,” Working Paper 102, 1985.

Helferich, Omar Keith, “Development of a Prototype Artificial Intelligence Systems for Customer Service Program Design and Evaluation,” Working Paper, 1986.

Helferich, Omar Keith, “Expert Systems in Logistics: A Review of Pragmatic Applications,” Working Paper, 1986.

Helferich, Omar Keith, “Leveraging Your Expert Systems Help Desk,” AI and the Help Desk, Help Desk Institute Annual Conference, Working Paper, 1991.

Helferich: Books and MonographONOGRAPHS PUBLISHED

Williams, Zack, Robert Cook, and Omar Keith Helferich, Global Supply Chain, Chapter- Managing Risk and Security The Service Logistics Provider Monograph Series, Published September 2009.

Helferich, Omar K and Robert Cook, Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management, Chapter 29 Global Supply Chain Security, Sage Publications, 2007.

Helferich, Omar K and Robert L. Cook, Securing the Supply Chain, Council of Logistics Management, Oak Brook, IL, 2002.

Bowersox, Donald J., David J. Closs, and Omar Keith Helferich, Logistical Management, MacMillan Publishing Company, 1983.

Bowersox, Donald J., Omar Keith Helferich, Edward J. Marien, Peter Gilmour, Michael L. Lawrence, Fred W. Morgan, and Richard T. Rogers, Dynamic Simulation of Physical Distribution Systems, Division of Research Graduate School of Business Administration, Michigan State University, 1972.

Go to the Top

Selected Articles by M. Douglas Voss, PhD

Voss: Selected Articles and Publications

Keller, Scott B., M. Douglas Voss, and John Ozment (in press), “A Step Toward Defining a Customer-Centric Taxonomy for Managing Logistics Personnel,” Journal of Business Logistics.

To retain competitive viability, some progressive warehouses and distribution centers are expanding services and adopting a customer orientation. Through cluster and ANOVA analyses three distinct classifications of frontline logistics managers are disclosed and compared with respect to their perceived levels of internal customer orientation toward their subordinates, common performance indicators, and other demographic and organizational-type variables. Important differences exist among the groups; however, logistics managers in all three clusters score relatively well in most areas explored.

Whipple, Judith M., M. Douglas Voss, and David J. Closs (2009), “Assessing Differences in Security Practices Between Firms Operating Globally and Domestically,” International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, 39 (7), p. 574-594.

This work is the first to compare the differences in security measures employed by firms maintaining internationally-oriented as opposed to domestically-oriented supply chains and also relates the implementation of supply chain security measures to security and firm performance. This research compares firms purchasing and/or selling food products internationally to those with domestic supply chains in order to determine if international firms 1) place greater managerial importance on security and 2) are more likely to engage supply chain partners in security-related verification and information exchange. This research also explores the link between security initiatives and firm performance in terms of security outcomes, product quality, and customer service. Initial results indicate respondents with international supply chains perceive that their firms place more importance on security and are more likely to assess the security procedures of supply chain partners. Results further indicate that, in general, respondents in international firms perceive better security performance is achieved in terms of the ability to detect and recover from security incidents. Once firms are grouped by performance, respondents in the high performance cluster, represented predominantly by international firms, perceived significantly higher performance in the areas examined.

Voss, M. Douglas, Judith M. Whipple, and David J. Closs (2009), “The Role of Strategic Security: Internal and External Security Measures with Security Performance Implications,” Transportation Journal, 48 (2), p. 5-23.

Ensuring a supply chain is secure from intentional as well as unintentional incidents is critically important in today’s global economy. However, some firms place a greater level of strategic importance on supply chain security than others. This research compares firms in the food industry that place a high level of strategic importance on security to firms that do not place a high level of strategic importance on security. The research assesses the measures employed by each group and resulting performance. Findings indicate that firms considering security to be a strategic priority perceive higher levels of security implementation and better security performance. Firms that place a high strategic priority on security show a greater ability to detect and recover from security incidents both inside the firm and across the supply chain in comparison to firms that place a low strategic priority on security. Cluster analysis grouped firms into high and low security performance categories in a manner consistent with the strategic priority construct and demonstrates the security measures that are likely to define high and low security performance.

Voss, M. Douglas, David J. Closs, Roger J. Calantone, O. Keith Helferich, and Cheri Speier (2009), “The Role of Security in the Food Supplier Selection Decision,” Journal of Business Logistics, 30 (1), p. 127-155.

This research assesses whether, and under what conditions, firms are willing to trade off price and delivery reliability for greater supplier security. Specifically, international sourcing and concern over security incidents occurring at the respondent’s firm are proposed as conditions that may increase demand for supplier security. This research suggests to managers the trade offs their customers may be willing to accept for increased security. Specifically, results indicate that food industry purchasing managers value low prices and high delivery reliability over advanced supplier security. However, if the purchasing agent is concerned about security incidents that have occurred at his/her firm, there is a greater tendency to accept lower delivery reliability and higher prices in order to utilize a supplier employing advanced security measures. Similarly, if a firm’s supplier is located overseas, purchasing agents displayed a greater willingness to trade off higher prices and lower delivery reliability for advanced supplier security. Results indicate that food purchasing agents may be willing to pay a 1-2% price premium in order to utilize secure suppliers under certain circumstances. The results are useful for firms evaluating whether they should invest in supply chain security measures.

Voss, M. Douglas, Thomas J. Page, Jr., Scott B. Keller, and John Ozment (2006),           “Determining Important Carrier Attributes: A Fresh Perspective Using the Theory of Reasoned Action,” Transportation Journal, 45 (3), p. 7-19.

The world has changed a great deal since the most recent installment in the carrier selection criteria literature. The terrorist attacks of September 11th, the recession that followed, and a current business environment characterized by constrained transportation capacity are all likely to have changed the emphasis shippers place on attributes used to select carriers. The authors posit that carrier’s security competency has grown more important in the post-September 11th world. Results indicate that security is not important to traffic managers when choosing carriers but is very important to supervisors who view security as a means of brand protection.

Closs, David J., Cheri Speier, Judith M. Whipple, and M. Douglas Voss (2008), “Supply Chain Security: A Framework for Protecting Your Supply Chain,” Logistics Management, 47 (9), p. 45-46.

Since supply chains are vulnerable to attack and subsequent security failures and supply chain defense has become an increasingly important issue for practitioners. Unfortunately, a comprehensive framework for securing the supply chain has not yet been created. This article discusses such a framework to guide practitioners in organizing security initiatives

Helferich, O. Keith, M. Douglas Voss, and John E. Griggs (2008), “Mitigation of Supply Chain Network Risk: Research and Results Applied to Security and Sustainability,” Distribution Business Management Journal, 7 (1), p. 72-77.

In today’s global marketplace, organizations are under increasing pressure to comply with a multitude of different performance guidelines and standards: quality management, product safety, occupational health and safety, import/export regulations. labor laws, environmental management and protection, and security. The pressure to sustain success in the global competitive environment while protecting the brand requires ongoing improvements of the supply chain risk management model with appropriate assessment and response solution processes. The objective of this article is to present a solution process with business applications that utilize web technology to address risk based assessment and response steps within the overall domain of global supply chain risk management. Readers will learn about the results of university research on supply chain security and the results of ongoing application of web based solutions to achieve more efficient and effective global supply chain risk management.

Closs, David J., Cheri Speier, Judith M. Whipple, and M. Douglas Voss (2008), “A Framework for Protecting Your Supply Chain,” Supply Chain Management Review, 12 (2), p. 38-45.

Recent terrorist threats and security incidents have heightened awareness regarding supply chain security. But many managers still underestimate supply chain vulnerability and struggle with where to focus their security efforts. This article presents a is a framework for doing just that.

Closs, David J., M. Douglas Voss, and Daniel French (2007), “What Should I do to Secure My Supply Chain?” Logistics Quarterly, 13 (2), p. 10-12.

Embarking on food supply chain security initiatives increases supply chain operating costs. Not surprisingly, given the value of security to consumers’ safety and a firm’s brand, more firms are making this investment. This article provides insights on security issues that firms face, based on 15 interviews with executives in the food industry and a team that Michigan State University created to research supply chain security at food manufacturers and distributors. This team also identified industry security practices and their perceived impact through a survey of food industry employees that included 238 respondents.

Voss, M. Douglas and Judith M. Whipple (2008), “Food Supply Chain Security:    Issues and ImplicationsZsidisin and Robert Ritchie (Eds.), Springer International, New York, NY., p. 350.,” Invited book chapter for Supply Chain Risk: A Handbook of Assessment, Management, and Performance, George Zsidisin and  Robert Ritchie (Eds.), Springer International, New York, NY., p. 350.

Prior to September 11th, 2001 the private sector was well aware of the threat of terrorism. However, the terrorist threats they perceived were different than those perceived today. In the early 1990’s, firms were mostly concerned about overseas employee kidnapping. Ports were more concerned with theft and smuggling. Beyond airline hijackings, the use of supply chain assets as a method to inflict damage was far from the minds of corporate America. This mindset changed drastically in the aftermath of September 11th. Following this event, the need to secure supply chains against terrorist-induced disruptions became more evident. As such, firms have begun to rethink “security” within the confines of their four walls as well as across the supply chain. Security is no longer just about theft or product damage, but now must incorporate an assessment of possible disruptions (intended as well as unintended) in an effort to prevent, detect, and potentially recover from such disruptions. This chapter examines the issues and implications of supply chain security with particular focus on the food industry.

Voss: Refereed Publications

Closs, David J., Gilbert N. Nyaga, and M. Douglas Voss (forthcoming), “The Differential Impact of Product Complexity, Inventory Level, and Configuration Capacity on Unit and Order Fill Rate Performance,” Journal of Operations Management.

Whipple, Judith M., M. Douglas Voss, and David J. Closs (2009), “Assessing Differences in Security Practices Between Firms Operating Globally and Domestically,” International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, 39 (7), p. 574-594.

Voss, M. Douglas, Judith M. Whipple, and David J. Closs (2009), “The Role of Strategic Security: Internal and External Security Measures with Security Performance Implications,” Transportation Journal, 48 (2), p. 5-23.

Voss, M. Douglas, David J. Closs, Roger J. Calantone, O. Keith Helferich, and Cheri Speier (2009), “The Role of Security in the Food Supplier Selection Decision,” Journal of Business Logistics, 30 (1), p. 127-155.

Cangelosi, Jr., Joseph D., Edward Ranelli, and M. Douglas Voss (2009), “Demographic Correlates of Preventative Health Care Attitudes and Lifestyle Patterns,” International Journal of Business Disciplines, 20 (1), p. 15-25.

Scott, Nancy, M. Douglas Voss, Scott B. Keller, and Matthew Schlosser (2008), “The Effects of Interdepartmental Customer Orientation on Distribution Center Performance,” Journal of Transportation Management, 19 (2), p. 54-70.

Zsidisin, George A., M. Douglas Voss, and Matthew Schlosser (2007), “Shipper-Carrier Relationships and Their Effect on Carrier Performance,” Transportation Journal, 46 (2), p. 5 – 18.

Voss, M. Douglas, Thomas J. Page, Jr., Scott B. Keller, and John Ozment (2006), “Determining Important Carrier Attributes: A Fresh Perspective Using the Theory of Reasoned Action,” Transportation Journal, 45 (3), p. 7 – 19.

Voss, M. Douglas, Roger J. Calantone, and Scott B. Keller (2005), “Internal Service Quality: Determinants of Distribution Center Performance,” International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, 35 (3), p. 161 – 176.

Voss, M. Douglas, Scott B. Keller, Alexander E. Ellinger, and John Ozment (2004), “Differentiating Supervisors and Coworkers as Suppliers of Job Products to Frontline Distribution Center Employees: Implications for Union and Non-Union Environments,” Transportation Journal, 43 (2), p. 37 – 58.

Voss: Non-Reffereed Publications

Closs, David J., Cheri Speier, Judith M. Whipple, and M. Douglas Voss (2008), “Supply Chain Security: A Framework for Protecting Your Supply Chain,” Logistics Management, 47 (9), p. 45-46.

Helferich, O. Keith, M. Douglas Voss, and John E. Griggs (2008), “Mitigation of Supply Chain Network Risk: Research and Results Applied to Security and Sustainability,” Distribution Business Management Journal, 7 (1), p. 72-77.

Closs, David J., Cheri Speier, Judith M. Whipple, and M. Douglas Voss (2008), “A Framework for Protecting Your Supply Chain,” Supply Chain Management Review, 12 (2), p. 38-45.

Voss, M. Douglas and Scott B. Keller (2008), “Listen to Your Customers,” Arkansas Trucking Report, 12 (6), p. 20-22.

Closs, David J., M. Douglas Voss, and Daniel French (2007), “What Should I do to Secure My Supply Chain?” Logistics Quarterly, 13 (2), p. 10-12.

Voss, M. Douglas (2003), “Book Review of Supply Chain Redesign: Transforming Supply Chains into Integrated Value Systems,” Handfield, Robert B. and Ernest L. Nichols, Jr (2002), Transportation Journal, 42 (3), p. 70-71.

Voss: Book Chapters

Voss, M. Douglas and Judith M. Whipple (2008), “Food Supply Chain Security: Issues and Implications,” Invited book chapter for Supply Chain Risk: A Handbook of Assessment, Management, and Performance, George Zsidisin and Robert Ritchie (Eds.), Springer International, New York, NY., p. 350.

Go to the Top